David Williams

Associate Professor

David Williams

Associate Professor

Academic Appointment(s)

Medical College of Georgia
Department of Psychiatry and Health Behavior

Bio

Dr. David Williams is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Health Behavior, Associate Director of Resident Education and Training, and Medical Director for Outpatient Services. He obtained his medical degree from the University of South Carolina School of Medicine and a BA in Evolutionary Biology from Princeton University. He completed his internship and General Psychiatry Residency Training at Augusta University and joined the faculty in 2014. His areas of clinical involvement include adult outpatient care and resident supervision in the Health Behavior and Esketamine Clinics.

  • (706) 721-6590
  • (706) 721-1793
  • EG3007

Education

  • MD, Medicine University of South Carolina -, 2010

  • BA, Ecology, Evolution and Populat Princeton University, 2005

Certifications

  • SC Medical License SC Medical Board,

  • BLS AHA,

  • Diplomate ABPN, 2014

  • PHY GA Composite Medical Board, 2012

Awards & Honors

  • Clinical Teacher of the Year MCG Dept of Psychiatry, 2020

  • Fellow Status APA, 2015

Courses Taught Most Recent Academic Year

  • RPSY 5000

    Psychiatry

Teaching Interests

mood and anxiety disorders, treatment resistant depression, and pharmacogenetics.

Scholarship

Selected Recent Publications

  • Updated Policies and Procedures for Spravato¬© (esketamine) administration in Augusta University (AU) Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic, 2023
    Other
  • Psychiatry Department/ Primary Care Collaboration, 2021
    Other
  • Policies and Procedures for Spravato¬© (esketamine) administration in Augusta University (AU), 2020
    Other
  • Association of self-reported burnout and protective factors within single-institution resident physicians, 2020
    Journal Article, Academic Journal
  • Update on Mood Disorders: Implications for Practice, 2016
    Other

Research Interests

mood and anxiety disorders, treatment resistant depression, and pharmacogenetics.