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Researching Heart Attack, Heart Failure, Stroke, Hypertension, Diabetes...

With the increasing frequency of obesity and diabetes, especially in Georgia, cardiovascular disease is reaching epidemic proportions.  The Vascular Biology Center at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University knows the demand is high for new and better treatments. Our internationally recognized team of research experts have one goal - to make breakthroughs in the prevention and treatment of disease so that we all may live longer, healthier lives.

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MCG receives $2.84 million to study cancer and heart disease

July 20, 2021WRDW/WAGT

Chances are you or someone you know has cancer or heart disease. Those two kill more people every year in the U.S. than anything else. And they disproportionally impact people of color. Now the Medical College of Georgia is one of four institutions in the country selected to help study the correlation between cancer and heart disease. The American Heart Association gave $11 million to four different institutions, and MCG got $2.84 million of it. They showed us how they’re enlisting students in their fight.

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Promising research for genetic disorders by using gene editing

July 26, 2021The MEANS Report with Brad Means

AUGUSTA, Ga. (WJBF) – Exciting research is underway at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, especially when it comes to genetics. Promising results have already been discovered that could correct genetic problems and create disease models. It all starts with gene editing, in particular – prime editing. So what is prime editing? We take a closer look at the exciting research this week with Dr. Joseph Miano – a vascular biologist – and Dr. Lin Gan – a geneticist – both at MCG.

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VBC News

group of doctors

Bidirectional impact of cardiovascular disease, cancer in Blacks focus of new AHA center at MCG

Cardiovascular disease and cancer, the nation’s top two killers, share common ground like obesity and chronic inflammation, as well as a disproportionate impact on Black Americans. A new American Heart Association-funded center at the Medical College of Georgia is working to better understand the bidirectional dynamic, including how to intervene when, for example, cancer treatment itself results in heart problems.

Two researchers, a man on the left and woman on the right, stand in a lab with white coats on

Copper transporter potential new treatment target for cardiovascular disease

An internal transporter that enables us to use the copper we consume in foods like shellfish and nuts to enable a host of vital body functions also has the essential role of protecting the receptor that enables us to grow new blood vessels when ours become diseased, Medical College of Georgia scientists report.

Dr. Eric Belin de Chantemele, in a white lab coat, leans next to a counter in his lab

Obesity, high-salt diet pose different cardiovascular risks in females, males

Younger and younger women are getting cardiovascular disease. Why? Their salt sensitivity and obesity have caused them to lose the natural protection youth and estrogen provide, MCG scientists say.

Drs. David Step (on left) and Jennifer Sullivan stand in hallway in white lab coats

NIH training grant enhances opportunities for biomedical graduate students

Augusta University has received a $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to help support the graduate education of future scientists whose focus is cardiometabolic diseases  — like hypertension and diabetes — which disproportionally affect minorities.

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