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The Georgia Cancer Center M. Bert Storey Research Building provides quality research space to promote multidisciplinary collaborations and translational research, which is essential to creating an environment that promotes innovation.

Our research approach supports important National Cancer Institute goals:

Ensuring every cancer patient has access to the newest and most innovative clinical trials in the nation

  • Clinicians and researchers work together to initiate new research protocols based on the clinician’s interaction with the patient
  • Each cancer patient receives personalized treatment through the interaction of the multidisciplinary team of clinicians and allied health professionals

The main building houses the basic science teams with four floors of open concept-lab space, shared resources and special equipment, such as flow cytometry, radiation therapy research platforms and quantitative pathology imaging as well as administrative offices and meeting spaces for seminars, lectures, training sessions and community-wide forums on cancer-related topics.

The Collaborator Corridor is a new addition designed to facilitate communication and collaboration between cancer researchers and clinicians, with a goal of promoting translational research in order to develop the next generation of cancer diagnostics and treatments.

The main building houses the basic science teams with four floors of open concept-lab space, shared resources and special equipment, such as flow cytometry, radiation therapy research platforms and quantitative pathology imaging as well as administrative offices and meeting spaces for seminars, lectures, training sessions and community-wide forums on cancer-related topics.

 

Contact Us

Georgia Cancer Center Research Programs

Health Sciences Campus

Georgia Cancer Center - M. Bert Storey Research Building

cancer@augusta.edu

1410 Laney Walker Boulevard
Augusta, GA 30912

Research Resources

Research Programs

There are four different focus areas of cancer research at the Georgia Cancer Center; Cancer Prevention, Control and Population Health, Tumor Signaling and Angiogenesis, Molecular Oncology and Biomarkers and Cancer Immunology, Inflammation and Tolerance.

Shared Resources

The Georgia Cancer Center supports shared research resources and facilities providing important support to members of the Cancer Center and their collaborators. The various resources offer access to state-of-the-art technology and computational support at an affordable cost.

Grant Support Services

The Georgia Cancer Center provides dedicated support to its researchers for the writing and submission of extramural and intramural grant applications.

Lab Directory

Learn more about the basic scientists working at the Georgia Cancer Center and how their work could advance the future of cancer research.

Cancer Research News

Doctor at computer

Structural framework for tumors also provides immune protection

Aggressive colorectal cancers set up an interactive network of checkpoints to keep the immune system at bay, scientists report.

Man with big block of ice

Sydenstricker’s blood transfusion research a century ago led to modern methods of tissue banking

In the early part of the last century, blood transfusions occurred directly from the donor to patient. Virgil Sydenstricker found a better way, and it's still in use today.

man sitting next to computer

National veteran dataset will help dissect mental illness, prostate cancer connections

There appears to be an unhealthy synergy between mental illness and prostate cancer, and researchers are working to dissect the relationship by first assembling the largest dataset ever of veterans with either condition or both.

three people in lab

Standard pathology tests outperform molecular subtyping in bladder cancer

While trying to develop a comparatively easy, inexpensive way to give physicians and their patients with bladder cancer a better idea of likely outcome and best treatment options, scientists found that sophisticated new subtyping techniques designed to do this provide no better information than long-standing pathology tests.