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The Georgia Cancer Center M. Bert Storey Research Building provides quality research space to promote multidisciplinary collaborations and translational research, which is essential to creating an environment that promotes innovation.

Our research approach supports important National Cancer Institute goals:

Ensuring every cancer patient has access to the newest and most innovative clinical trials in the nation

  • Clinicians and researchers work together to initiate new research protocols based on the clinician’s interaction with the patient
  • Each cancer patient receives personalized treatment through the interaction of the multidisciplinary team of clinicians and allied health professionals

The main building houses the basic science teams with four floors of open concept-lab space, shared resources and special equipment, such as flow cytometry, radiation therapy research platforms and quantitative pathology imaging as well as administrative offices and meeting spaces for seminars, lectures, training sessions and community-wide forums on cancer-related topics.

The Collaborator Corridor is a new addition designed to facilitate communication and collaboration between cancer researchers and clinicians, with a goal of promoting translational research in order to develop the next generation of cancer diagnostics and treatments.

The main building houses the basic science teams with four floors of open concept-lab space, shared resources and special equipment, such as flow cytometry, radiation therapy research platforms and quantitative pathology imaging as well as administrative offices and meeting spaces for seminars, lectures, training sessions and community-wide forums on cancer-related topics.

 

Contact Us

Georgia Cancer Center Research Programs

Health Sciences Campus

Georgia Cancer Center - M. Bert Storey Research Building

cancer@augusta.edu

1410 Laney Walker Boulevard
Augusta, GA 30912

Research Resources

Research Programs

There are four different focus areas of cancer research at the Georgia Cancer Center: Cancer Prevention, Control and Population Health, Tumor Signaling and Angiogenesis, Molecular Oncology and Biomarkers and Cancer Immunology, Inflammation and Tolerance.

Shared Resources

The Georgia Cancer Center supports shared research resources and facilities providing important support to members of the Cancer Center and their collaborators. The various resources offer access to state-of-the-art technology and computational support at an affordable cost.

Grant Support Services

The Georgia Cancer Center provides dedicated support to its researchers for the writing and submission of extramural and intramural grant applications.

Lab Directory

Learn more about the basic scientists working at the Georgia Cancer Center and how their work could advance the future of cancer research.

Protocol Review & Monitoring Committee (PRMC)

The PRMC provides internal scientific review for all new cancer-related clinical research studies within the Georgia Cancer Center.

Cancer Research News

Dr. Ravindra Kolhe stands in the forefront of a lab with his research associate looking on

High expression of cell death genes associated with early death from lung cancer

Patients with a high number of genes most associated with pathways that lead to cell death in lung cancer are at increased risk of dying early from their disease, researchers report.

Three black women

Georgia Cancer Center researcher launches health disparity study on breast cancer in Georgia’s Black community

Learn how a researcher at the Georgia Cancer Center is working to eliminate Georgia's breast cancer disparities.

Medical worker

Georgia Cancer Center receives grant to study clinical trial hesitancy in the Black community

Georgia Cancer Center researcher tackles clinical trial hesitancy in the Black community in the southeast.

Doctor

$1.8 million NCI grant enables exploration of cancer-fighting compound isolated from Moroccan fungus

MCG and Georgia Cancer Center scientists have early evidence that the peptide EnnA, isolated from a fungus living symbiotically with a flowering plant known for its penchant of trapping flies, could be a powerful opponent of aggressive triple negative breast cancer.