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The Medical College of Georgia Department of Physiology’s focus is the framework of the body's cells, organs and systems, how they work and how abnormal function leads to disease.

The department is dedicated to outstanding research and excellence in education.

Our federally-funded scientists study some of the nation's top killers like cardiovascular disease and hypertension, and train independent, creative, productive scholars and PhD graduates, who publish in top tier journals and who are competitive for positions wherever they choose to go.

The department offers programs leading to the PhD degree. A combined MD/PhD or DMD/PhD degree program is available for students who obtain prior or concurrent admission to the Medical College of Georgia (MCG) or the Dental College of Georgia.

In all programs, extensive experience in the philosophy and performance of basic and biomedical research is stressed. By virtue of their interdisciplinary training, the department's graduates compete successfully for positions in medical schools, universities, government and industry.

 

Physiology News

two people

New model helping identify pregnant women whose previous kidney injury puts them, babies at risk

Young pregnant women, who appear to have fully recovered from an acute injury that reduced their kidney function, have higher rates of significant problems like preeclampsia and low birthweight babies. MCG scientists are working to better understand, identify and ideally avoid this recently identified association.

doctors in lab

Higher blood pressure over life span increases congestive heart failure risk in Black people

Starting with early childhood, otherwise healthy Black people show signs of slightly diminished heart muscle strength and a slightly higher blood pressure than their white counterparts, possibly putting them on a course for early development of congestive heart failure.

woman in lab

Females use anti-inflammatory T cells to keep their blood pressure down

In the face of a multipronged front to drive blood pressure up, including a high-salt diet, females are better able to keep their pressure down by increasing levels of a T cell that selectively dials back inflammation, scientists say.

Doctor in lab

Cells that make our insides slick also calm our spleens

It’s called icing sugar spleen, when the usually purplish organ looks like it has been dipped in unhealthy white icing, and the surface is bumpy and thick.

 

Calendar

Feb 25

Department of Physiology Research Seminar Series presenting Dr. Xinyun Lu
Dr. Xinyun Lu, Department Chair, Neurosciences and Regenerative Medicine will present a seminar titled "Chronic Stress, Silencing of 'Hunger Neurons' and Depression.

Additional Seminars

Contact Us

Department of Physiology

Health Sciences Campus

Interdisciplinary Research Center

706-721-7741

1120 15th Street, CA 3126, Augusta, GA 30912

706-721-7299