INQUIRY 1000 COURSE


INQR 1000 COURSES FOR FALL 2017

Tuesdays, 2:30 - 3:45 P.M.

Can You Hear Me Now? Building Leadership Through Improving Advocacy Skills

Can You Hear Me Now? Building Leadership Through Improving Advocacy Skills

Taught by: Leeper

 

Augusta University hopes to produce graduates who are well trained in their chosen fields.  And while a solid foundation of knowledge is essential, those students who understand how to be effective advocates for themselves, their ideas and the things they value will be leaders in those fields.  In this course, students will explore theories about what makes advocates effective and they will apply those principles to an issue of significance to them.

Become Your Own Hero: Discovering Learning through Play

Become Your Own Hero: Discovering Learning through Play

Taught by: Gilbert

 Linville

In this course, students will explore how play (experiential learning activities) affects academic, social, and emotional development. By engaging in various levels of play, students will learn about themselves, how play engages learners in discovery, and how the hidden brain affects how we see ourselves and others.  Plato once said, "You can learn more about someone in one hour of play, than in a year of conversation.”  What can you learn about yourself and the world around you?  Come play with us and discover your inner hero!

Social (In)Activism in Sport

Social (In)Activism in Sport

Taught by: Bennett

 

This course is designed to explore how athletes navigate social activism within sport or their lack of activism. Recently, athletes have used the sporting world as an avenue for social activism. This has been seen and perceived as both positive and negative. This class is designed to explore social activism, or "inactivism", and how athletes use or do not use their platform to navigate their social justice agendas.

 

 

Thursdays, 2:30 - 3:45 P.M.

A Hero's Journey of a Thousand Miles

A Hero's Journey of a Thousand Miles

Taught by: Chatto

 

In this course, students will explore the origins of human walking, examine the ways people walk, and explore the lives of people who have lost the ability to walk. Students will research ways people use walking to improve the human condition through physical, psychological and social ways.

To See Yourself Become the Villain: When Heroes Fall (Can They Rise Again?)

To See Yourself Become the Villain: When Heroes Fall (Can They Rise Again?)

Taught by: Diehl

 

In this section, we will be studying works where heroes become villains. Instead of considering anti-heroes (who are really just villains we root for), we will discuss men and women who cross the threshold of villainy. We will also consider the question: can these men & women become heroes again?

Who Done It? Armchair Detectives and Modern Crime Fighting

Who Done It? Armchair Detectives and Modern Crime Fighting

Taught by: Griffith

 

This course will explore crime fighting from the comfort of their armchairs focusing on popular solved and unsolved cases. Using critical thinking, we will address the modern crime fighter focusing on techniques, technology, and popularity of crime in media.

Take Courage: How to Tackle Contemporary Ethical Issues

Take Courage: How to Tackle Contemporary Ethical Issues

Taught by: Weiss

 

Students will identify the key ethical questions pertaining to a contemporary ethical issue, as well as develop a well-supported ethical argument for their position, and anticipate and respond effectively to a counter-argument.

[HONORS] “Because You’re the Special”: Technology, Utopia, and Heroes in Animated Films

[HONORS] “Because You’re the Special”: Technology, Utopia, and Heroes in Animated Films

Taught by: Armstrong

 

Plato argued that people’s values are fundamentally shaped by the stories they encounter as children. With that in mind, we will investigate the values found in five recent animated films that focus on issues of technology, utopia, and the hero: WALL-E (2008), The Lorax (2012), Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 (2013), The Lego Movie (2014), and Big Hero 6 (2014). Our guiding question will be ‘What values would a viewer of these films carry into college?’

 

 

Fridays, 11:00 A.M. - 12:15 P.M.

The Spin Stops Here: Using Technological Tools To Be Agents For Change

The Spin Stops Here: Using Technological Tools To Be Agents For Change

Taught by: Gess

 Barker

Grounded in the challenge of equal opportunity and justice, the local educational context will be used as a platform to develop the skills of research, investigation, questioning, critical analysis, and civil discourse. Using commonly available free apps and GPS technology, students will create resources that accurately chronicle and illuminate challenges and celebrations of urban education in the Augusta area.

Jaguar Jumpstart: Grit and Persistence [Permission Only]

Jaguar Jumpstart: Grit and Persistence [Permission Only]

Taught by: Huggins

 

During this course, students will explore the concepts of persistence and grit, on both a personal and societal level. Students groups will produce a project which highlights the attributes of persistence and grit of individual(s) in our community and share this ethnography with students, faculty and visitors at the end of term EXPO.

Do we build "The Wall": Immigration Policy in the 21st Century

Do we build "The Wall": Immigration Policy in the 21st Century

Taught by: Ratan/Gray

 

This is a one credit discussion- based course designed to introduce students to the topic of immigration and immigration policy. Students will 1) learn about the history and politics of migration using a comparative global perspective 2) examine the evolution of immigration policy in the United States, 3) distinguish between immigrants and refugees, and 4) engage in an experiential learning opportunity that will help them understand some of the challenges facing immigrants.

 

 

Fridays, 12:00 - 1:15 P.M.

The Art of Heroes — Myths & Legends of the Underdog

The Art of Heroes — Myths & Legends of the Underdog

Taught by: Andrews

 

How do we picture our heroes, and why? From the ancient Gilgamesh to Superman and Luke Skywalker, mankind has always had heroes. Often, our most enduring heroes began as commoners, an everyday Joe or underdog. Each culture and each era depicts their heroes differently. Through a survey of historic and iconic paintings, sculptures, photos and films, this course will explore how and why we depict our heroes the way we do.

(Un) Ethical Heroes: Drugs, Celebrity, and Sport

(Un) Ethical Heroes: Drugs, Celebrity, and Sport

Taught by: Meyers/Connolly

 

This course will cover modern-day heroes of sport who were later outed as drug cheats: Topics covered will include the treatment of athletes as heroes/celebrities in culture; Media treatment during the course of various outings, trials, and suspensions; Performance enhancing drugs and their mechanisms of action; and ethics in sport and performance.

Magic and Medicine: Exploring The Heroic Age Of Medicine And Its Effects On Our Modern World

Magic and Medicine: Exploring The Heroic Age Of Medicine And Its Effects On Our Modern World

Taught by: Logue

 

In this course students will investigate the strange history of modern medicine and the extreme measures doctors took to treat their patients. Students will use literature searching, primary sources, and pop culture to ask how our modern medical practices were shaped by the heroic age of medicine.

Humans, Heroes and Hippocrates

Humans, Heroes and Hippocrates

Taught by: Kornegay

 

In this course students will engage in dialogues and inquiry about medical ethics through studying major medical research - and the humans behind it. They will explore ethical questions and quandaries to develop their own moral code and compass

 

 

Fridays, 1:00 - 2:15 P.M.

Hero, Human, or Villain: The Portrayal of Professionals Through Popular Media

Hero, Human, or Villain: The Portrayal of Professionals Through Popular Media

Taught by: Kemp

Eisenman 

Different professions are portrayed in a variety of way by popular media. Because of this, the public has misconception of what professionals actually do. Over the course of the semester, students in this INQR 1000 course will critically analyze the portrayal of teachers, police, doctors, etc. in public media and how these portrayals influence public perceptions.

Dangers and Hazards of Social Media and the Internet

Dangers and Hazards of Social Media and the Internet

Taught by: Nowatkowski

 

Students will explore hazards and dangers associated with social media and the Internet.  Once the students determine several hazards and dangers that directly affect them, they will explore methods and techniques to mitigate these hazards and dangers. 

 

 

Online

"Real" Heroes: Sports and Heroism in Everyday Life

"Real" Heroes: Sports and Heroism in Everyday Life

Taught by: Hunt

 

What is a hero in today's society? Students in this course will explore what makes a "real" hero and develop plans and strategies for becoming one themselves.    

Ketogenic Diet: Health and Performance

Ketogenic Diet: Health and Performance

Taught by: Holland

 

In this course students will explore scientific research regarding the ketogenic diet in terms of health outcomes and athletic performance.  Students will discuss how the ketogenic diet differs from the recommended USDA diet and their views and concerns of these differences.