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Welcome to the Georgia Prevention Institute (GPI) where it is our mission to improve health and healthcare across the lifespan through research, education, and service.

The GPI works to support the community through innovative research with the goal of better understanding and preventing some of our state and nation’s top killers – like cardiovascular disease and obesity.

Our research on mechanisms related to disease has helped transition observational studies into clinical trials with a direct impact on patient care. These studies have the potential of changing patient care in high risk populations.  Our research focuses on hypertension, diabetes, obesity, lung disease, kidney disease, osteoporosis, diet, inflammation, alcohol intake, music, stress reduction and early life stress to name a few. These changes have increased our total funding to $100 million since our inception. Our continued growth and development will allow us to continue serving the community in disease prevention and treatment.

The Georgia Prevention Institute offers a variety of opportunities for members of our community and the surrounding area to partner with us in research.  Our clinical research studies, all of which are compensated, take place at our facility at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University.  These studies offer the opportunity to impact the health and lives of our generation and those to come.  If you are interested in learning more about the research studies available at the GPI, follow the Ongoing Clinical Research tile where you can learn about active studies and how you can become involved!

Contact Us

Georgia Prevention Institute

Health Sciences Campus

Annex I

706-721-4534

706-721-7150

Room 1640

gpi@augusta.edu

DIRECTIONS TO GPI

GPI News

Three doctors walking

Study aims to improve health of patients with CF across their increasing lifespan

MCG investigators are eyeing the non-pulmonary effects of cystic fibrosis, like barriers to nutrition and exercise, to help improve and increase the lifespan of people with the disease.

Dr. Gaston Kapuku, in white lab coat, stands in front of lab equipment

Rapid decreases in resting heart rate from childhood to adulthood may indicate heart trouble ahead

Medical College of Georgia investigators report a significant association between a faster decrease in resting heart rate from childhood to adulthood and a larger left ventricle, an indicator that cardiovascular disease may be on the horizon.

doctors in lab

Higher blood pressure over life span increases congestive heart failure risk in Black people

Starting with early childhood, otherwise healthy Black people show signs of slightly diminished heart muscle strength and a slightly higher blood pressure than their white counterparts, possibly putting them on a course for early development of congestive heart failure.

Doctors in lab

‘Danger molecule’ associated with being obese, female and black in younger adults

A “danger molecule” is higher in the blood of younger black adults than whites, females than males and increases with weight and age, researchers report.

 MORE GPI NEWS