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The unifying theme of the Tumor Signaling & Angiogenesis program is to build translational clinical trials based on innovative and novel research projects that focus on signaling cascades leading to uncontrolled cell growth and resistance to apoptosis.

The program goals are to identify dysregulated molecular signaling pathways that can be used as cancer-specific targets. Collectively the members of this program work cooperatively to study a variety of kinase targets involved in cancer cell proliferation and progression.

Targets identified in this program can be exploited to develop innovative approaches to cancer prevention and therapy that can be translated into clinical trials. The research into cancer cell signaling incorporates animal models in breast and colon cancer, as well as the pediatric cancer neuroblastoma, to study how specific signaling pathways are involved in the progression of cancer.

Program Members

photo of Ali Arbab, MD, PhD

Ali Arbab, MD, PhD

  • Professor
photo of Ellen K. LeMosy, MD, PhD

Ellen K. LeMosy, MD, PhD

  • Associate Professor
photo of Honglin Li, PhD

Honglin Li, PhD

  • Associate Professor
photo of Betty Pace, MD

Betty Pace, MD

  • Professor
photo of Daitoku Sakamuro, PhD

Daitoku Sakamuro, PhD

  • Associate Professor
photo of Patricia V. Schoenlein, PhD

Patricia V. Schoenlein, PhD

  • Associate Professor
photo of Muthusamy Thangaraju, PhD

Muthusamy Thangaraju, PhD

  • Associate Professor
photo of Guangyu Wu, PhD

Guangyu Wu, PhD

  • Professor

Cancer Research News

Kaur

Georgia Cancer Center welcomes associate director of basic science

“Getting to meet incredible physicians and scientists and learn about the fabulous science that takes place here has been the best part of my job so far,” Kaur said of her new position as associate director of basic science at the Georgia Cancer Center.

man with glasses in jacket standing in front of dry erase board

Augusta University physicist joins international team to study how cells move

“Cells are very complicated systems that we are still working to understand, so we had to find a way to simplify it," said Abdul N. Malmi-Kakkada, PhD.

Man in black coat and shirt leans against building

Moore recognized with AACR Minorities in Cancer Research award

Dr. Justin Xavier Moore has been recognized with an American Association for Cancer Research Minorities in Cancer Research award.

Colon Cancer Awareness Month ribbon in front of picture of the Georgia Cancer Center

Oncology professor answers questions regarding National Colon Cancer Awareness Month

"Colon cancer is largely preventable if patients undergo screening tests, like a surveillance colonoscopy starting at 45 years or earlier depending on family history."