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The unifying theme of the Tumor Signaling & Angiogenesis program is to build translational clinical trials based on innovative and novel research projects that focus on signaling cascades leading to uncontrolled cell growth and resistance to apoptosis.

The program goals are to identify dysregulated molecular signaling pathways that can be used as cancer-specific targets. Collectively the members of this program work cooperatively to study a variety of kinase targets involved in cancer cell proliferation and progression.

Targets identified in this program can be exploited to develop innovative approaches to cancer prevention and therapy that can be translated into clinical trials. The research into cancer cell signaling incorporates animal models in breast and colon cancer, as well as the pediatric cancer neuroblastoma, to study how specific signaling pathways are involved in the progression of cancer.

Program Members

photo of Ali Arbab, MD, PhD

Ali Arbab, MD, PhD

  • Professor
photo of Han-Fei Ding, PhD

Han-Fei Ding, PhD

  • Professor
photo of Ellen K. LeMosy, MD, PhD

Ellen K. LeMosy, MD, PhD

  • Associate Professor
photo of Honglin Li, PhD

Honglin Li, PhD

  • Associate Professor
photo of Betty Pace, MD

Betty Pace, MD

  • Professor
photo of Daitoku Sakamuro, PhD

Daitoku Sakamuro, PhD

  • Associate Professor
photo of Patricia V. Schoenlein, PhD

Patricia V. Schoenlein, PhD

  • Associate Professor
photo of Muthusamy Thangaraju, PhD

Muthusamy Thangaraju, PhD

  • Associate Professor
photo of Guangyu Wu, PhD

Guangyu Wu, PhD

  • Professor

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