Bran CromerAssociate Professor
Office: Science Hall E-2017 
Phone: 706-667-4573
Email: rcromer@augusta.edu

 

CLASSES TAUGHT AT Augusta University
  • BIOL 2111: Human Anatomy & Physiology I
  • BIOL 2112: Human Anatomy & Physiology II
  • BIOL 4100: Principles of Ecology
  • BIOL 3310: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
  • BIOL 4430: Ornithology

 

EDUCATIONAL/CAREER BACKGROUND
  • B.S. in Biology - University of South Carolina Aiken, Aiken, SC
  • M.S. in Forestry & Wildlife Biology - Clemson University, Clemson, SC
  • M.S. in Forestry & Wildlife Biology - Clemson University, Clemson, SC

 

FUN FACT(S)

The annual round trip migration of the Arctic tern (Sterna paradisaea) from pole to pole is over 44,000 miles.

During the course of my field research I have been bitten by many species of animals. These include: over ten species of snakes (none venomous), four lizard species, three turtle species, three bird species, a couple of squirrels, a possum, several shrews, and one frightened beagle.


MEMBERSHIP TO BIOLOGY SOCIETIES
  • Association of Southeastern Biologists
  • Society of Vertebrate Paleontology
  • Wildlife Society
  • TriBeta (Biology Honor's Society)
  • Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles
    • Partners in Amphibian and Reptile ConservationAZZZZ
  • Xi Sigma Pi (Forestry Honor's Society)

 

RESEARCH INTERESTS

My research interests lie in the field of vertebrate ecology. At ASU I, with at lot of help from my students!, have researched heavy metal presence in freshwater turtles and the home-range and habitat use of freshwater turtles. I also have an ongoing monitoring project investigating the nesting success of red-headed woodpeckers in fire-adapted ecosystems. I have also researched bat ecology and behavior by recording their vocalizations and have ongoing projects using trail cameras to monitory wildlife populations.


CURRENT UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECTS AND STUDENTS

Currently, I am mentoring two undergraduate research projects.  One project is evaluating mercury uptake in freshwater turtles.  We are collecting blood samples, claw clippings, and carapace (shell) scraping from local turtle species, principally the yellow-bellied slider (Trachemys scripta).  Additionally, we are evaluating the possibility of mercury transfer from mother to egg.  By inducing egg deposition in gravid females, we have been able to acquire non-viable eggs that will be analyzed for mercury concentration. 

Students involved in this research include:

  • Kimberly Price
  • Patricia Coleman
  • Elgin Hobbs

My second project involves in use of PVC pipe as traps for tree frogs.  Foot-long segments of PVC, capped at one end, have been attached to trees at local wetlands.  The PVC serves as artificial habitat for such frogs as the green tree frog (Hyla cinerea) and the squirrel tree frog (Hyla squirella).  The PVC segments are checked weekly for tree frogs.  The goal of this project is to evaluate tree frog diversity at distinct wetlands.

Students involved in this research include:

  • Aleesha Mincey
  • Megan Pike
  • Kevan Khaksafard

 

FORMER RESEARCH STUDENTS
  • Mathew Coleman
  • Zack Di Iulio
  • Nathaniel Fuller
  • Brigette Haram
  • John Martin
  • Salina Patton
  • Jonathan Stanford
  • Katie Trimble

 

PUBLICATIONS

Cromer, R.B. 2007. Associations between two bottomland hardwood forest shrew species and hurricane-generated woody debris. Southeastern Naturalist 6(2): 235-246. 

Cromer, R.B. In revision. Role of hurricane-generated debris as habitat for herpetofauna. 

Cromer, R.B., J.D. Lanham, and H.G. Hanlin. 2002. Herpetofaunal Response to Gap and Skidder-Rut Wetland Creation in a Southern Bottomland Hardwood Forest. In: S. Destefano and R.G. Haight (eds): Forest Wildlife-Habitat Relationships: Population and Community Responses to Forest Management. Society of American Foresters, Bethesda, Maryland. pp. 288. 

Cromer, R.B., J.D. Lanham, and H.G. Hanlin. 2002. Herpetofaunal Response to Gap and Skidder-Rut Wetland Creation in a Southern Bottomland Hardwood Forest. Forest Science 48 (2): 407-416. 



Additional Information