History of the Medical College of Georgia


1988-2001

MCG 5K Run
MCG 5K Run

The Medical College of Georgia continued to expand public services by adding and enlarging medical centers in the 1990s. The institution established a Center for Sports Medicine, Vascular Biology Center, Telemedicine Center and Center for Senior Health. In 1993, the Board of Regents approved MCG offering the first external-degree program, a baccalaureate degree in medical technology, which utilized distance-learning technology. The Board of Regents also converted the University System of Georgia from quarter format to semester format in fall 1998. MCG initiated an early retirement program in 2000-2001. Most eligible faculty and staff retired.

Talmadge Hospital expanded patient services with the Ambulatory and Specialized Care Centers in 1992. MCG dedicated the Children's Medical Center in 1998. The century ended with MCG Health Inc., a non-profit organization, assuming management of MCG's clinical facilities. The separation allowed the hospital to adopt business practices without state restrictions.

Blue Laser Technology
Blue Laser Technology
Flood of 1991
Flood of 1991
Graduation 1988
Graduation 1988

Dr. Francis J. Tedesco (1944-)
President, 1988-2001

Francis TedescoDr. Francis J. Tedesco graduated from St. Louis University School of Medicine in 1969. He taught at the University of Pennsylvania, Washington University School of Medicine and the University of Miami School of Medicine before joining the MCG faculty in 1978 as associate professor of medicine and chief of the Section of Gastroenterology. MCG promoted him to professor in 1981. The university appointed him acting vice president for clinical activities in 1984 and interim dean for the School of Medicine two years later.

The Board of Regents inaugurated Dr. Tedesco on July 1, 1988 as the sixth president of the Medical College of Georgia. During his presidency, the university continued to expand with more research programs, clinical care centers and buildings. The quality of education also increased during his presidency with competitive admission and most students passing their board exams. The American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy awarded Dr. Tedesco the 1993 Rudolf Schindler Award, its highest distinction in recognition of his contributions to gastrointestinal endoscopy. Dr. Tedesco retired in 2001 and was named President Emeritus.

Ambulatory Care Center and Specialized Care Center

Ambulatory Care CenterThe Ambulatory Care Center (ACC) and Specialized Care Center (SCC) are located on Harper Street. Construction on this project began in March 1990. The firm of Jova, Daniels and Busby served as the architect and interior designer. Brasfield and Gorrie were the contractors. These facilities added 365,822 square feet to the patient-care complex. MCGs Master Plan, a 10-year plan for MCG first developed in the mid-1980s, included both the ACC and the SCC. In December 1992, the Specialized Care Center added an emergency room, trauma center, outpatient clinics and four 12-bed intensive care units. Its adjoining Ambulatory Care Center began housing outpatient clinics in 1993.

Childrens Medical Center

Children's Medical CenterThe Childrens Medical Center, located on Harper Street, was dedicated in May 1998 and occupied in December 1998. The architectural firm Stanley Beaman & Sears designed the 227,848-square-foot, 112-bed hospital, built with capital expenditures of $58,968,166. Kathleen Girdler Engler created the sculpture "Nature of Healing," located in the main entrance. Dr. and Mrs. Lloyd Schnucks contribution made this artwork possible. The sculpture was unveiled in November 1999.

Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics

Institute of Molecular Medicine and GeneticsDuring Dr. Francis Tedesco's presidency, MCG established the Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics in 1993. The IMMAG promotes "research excellence in the basic biomedical and clinical sciences at MCG." The Georgia Research Alliance, whose primary mission is to help Georgia universities modernize research facilities, provided crucial funding to buy equipment.