Theja DeSilva

Assistant Professor

Theja DeSilva

Assistant Professor

Academic Appointment(s)

College of Science and Mathematics
Department of Chemistry and Physics

Education

  • Ph.D., Physics, General. University of Cincinnati, 2004

Awards & Honors

  • ITAMP Visiting Scientist Award: 2017 Institute for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics, Harvard University, 2017

  • KITP Scholar Award: 2017 Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics, 2017

  • KITP Scholar Award:2016 Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics, 2016

  • McMicken College Outstanding Doctoral Student Award McMicken College of Arts and Sciences, University of Cincinnati, 2005

Courses Taught Most Recent Academic Year

  • PHYS 1111L

    Intro to Physics I Lab
  • PHYS 1111

    Introductory Physics I
  • PHYS 4990

    Undergrad Research
  • PHYS 4600

    Quantum Mechanics

Scholarship

Selected Recent Publications

  • An effective series expansion to the equation of state of unitary Fermi gases, 2016
    Journal Article, Academic Journal
  • An effective mean field theory for the coexistence of anti-ferromagnetism and superconductivity: Applications to iron-based superconductors and cold Bose–Fermi atomic mixtures, 2016
    Journal Article, Academic Journal
  • Phase diagram of strongly attractive p-orbital fermions on optical lattices, 2015
    Journal Article, Academic Journal
  • "Polarization Induced Phase separation and Re-entrant Transition of Two- component Fermions in One-dimensional Lattice”, 2015
    Journal Article, Academic Journal
  • Evidence for the breakdown of momentum independent many-body t-matrix approximation in the normal phase of bosons, 2014
    Journal Article, Academic Journal

Research Interests

I am seeking to gain an understanding of the physics on the scale of single atoms/electrons, where classical mechanics fails. In particular, we are wondering how do complex phenomena emerge from simple ingredients? Why do some interesting physical phenomena emerge as a collective aspect of the matter, but not as a properties of individual constituent particles? We seek to understand the connection between microscopic and macroscopic phenomena of many body systems. In particular, we study the electronic matter related to the real materials such as transition metal oxides and rare earth oxides, and ultra-cold atomic systems as test beds for strongly correlated and collective phenomena.

Department Service

  • student recruitment, retention, and advising. 2014 - Present

    Role: Student Placement
  • Search Committee Member 2015 - 2015

    Role: Committee Member

College Service

  • Instructional Technology Advisory Committee 2015 - Present

    Role: Committee Member
  • Search Committee Member: dean COSM 2014 - 2014

    Role: Committee Member

University Service

  • Department Champion: College of Science and Mathematics, IGRU Campaign 2015 - Present

    Role: Committee Member
  • Graduate Council Representative: COSM 2014 - Present

    Role: Committee Member

Professional Service

  • APS March Meeting, Session B12 - 2012

    Role: Chairperson
  • NSF day workshop - 2009

    Role: Other
  • APS Division of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics - 2008

    Role: Other
  • APS March Meeting, Session Q14 - 2008

    Role: Chairperson
  • APS Division of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics - 2008

    Role: Other