July 24, 2015
 

2015 Student AwardsCongratulations to our students who received honors in the Student Salon during the 70th annual conference of the Association of Medical Illustrators.  Awards went to:

Josh Klein (’15): Award of Merit, Advertising and Marketing/Promotional, for “Glaucoma”

Lauren Halligan (’15): Award of Excellence, Interactive, for the website “Clinical Anatomy of the Brainstem”

Megan Llewellyn (’15): Award of Excellence, Interactive, for the ebook “How Vaccines Work! A Comic”

 

To view the work online, go to: http://ami.org/meetings/2015/online-salon/
 


July 24, 2015
 

Elizabeth Nixon-Shapiro, The Renin Angiotensin SystemSeveral of our alumni or the companies they run received honors in the Professional Salon during the 70th annual conference of the Association of Medical Illustrators. Congratulations!

Awards went to:

Elizabeth Nixon-Shapiro (’14), Award of Excellence, Didactic/Instructional Non-Commercial, for “The Renin-Angiotensin System“

 Mica Duran (’00), Award of Merit, Didactic/Instructional Commercial, for “MatriStem Anterior Repair — Surgical Technique Guide“

 Andrew Swift (’99), Award of Excellence, Didactic/Instructional Commercial, for “Lymphoma“

 Nathaniel “Nick” Klein (“09), Award of Excellence, Advertising and Marketing/Promotional, for “Antibody Conjugated Superparamagnetic Magnitite Nanoparticles in the High-Resolution Identification of Small Tumors“

 Jennifer Darcy (’04), Award of Merit, Medical-Legal, for “John Doe’s Facial Trauma and Resulting Surgery“

 Hardy Fowler (’07), Award of Merit, Medical-Legal, for “Development of Forehead Flap to Cover Nasal Tip Defect“

 Mary Beth Clough (’96) with Elizabeth McDonald (’10) at Nucleus Medical Media owned by Ron Collins ('90) and Keith Pavlik ('89):, Award of Merit, Animation- Didactic/Instructional- Non-Commercial for Active Transport

 Radius Digital Science, owned by Brandon Pletsch  (’03) and Michelle Peterson (’08),  Award of Excellence, Animation and Marketing/Promotional, for “RenLane™ Renal Denervation System Animation”

 Radius Digital Science, Award of Excellence, Animation and Marketing/Promotional, for “ELOCTATE™ Fc Fusion Animation”

 Radius Digital Science, Award of Merit, Animation Didactic/Instructional – Commercial, for “Arginine Vasopressin and Hyponatremia”

 Radius Digital Science, Award of Merit, Animation Didactic/Instructional – Commercial, for “Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A Diagnostic & Treatment Overview Animation”

 Radius Digital Science, Award of Merit, Interactive Media Didactic/Instructional – Commercial, for “NEXAVAR® Interactive Case Profile App”

 Radius Digital Science, Award of Excellence, Animation Didactic/Instructional – Commercial, for “ABILIFY MAINTENA® Dual Chamber Syringe – Instructions for Use Animation”

 MediVisuals, Inc., owned by Bob Shepherd (’81), Award of Merit, Animation- Medical-Legal, “Constrained Liner Hip Prosthesis: Device Failure”

 iSO-Form, LLC, owned in part by Nick Klein ('09) and Andrew Swift (’99), Award of Merit, Interactive Media Didactic/Instructional – Non-Commercial, “Diabetic Macular Edema: Treatment Overview CME Activity”

 Ellen Davis (’14), Award of Merit, Interactive Textbook, for “Understanding Heartworm Disease & Treatment: A Veterinary Guide“

 Tasha Obrin (’14), Award of Excellence, Interactive textbook, for “From Glucose to ATP: With and Without Oxygen“


To view the work online, go to: http://ami.org/meetings/2015/online-salon/
 
 
Congratulations to the Class of 2015

July 24, 2015
 
iSO-FORM, LLC, owned in part by Nick Klein ('09) and Andrew Swift (’99) was awarded the 2015 Dr. Frank H. Netter Award for Special Contributions to Medical Education for their interactive BoneBox™ Skull Viewer. The award is granted by the Vesalius Trust for Visual Communication in Health Sciences. Congratulations on this honor.


iSO-FORM, LLC BoneBox Skull Viewer
 
Congratulations to the Class of 2015

May 8, 2015
 
Congratulations to the Class of 2015! On Thursday, May 7, 2015, the Class of 2015 presented their masters' research projects to a group of faculty, family, and friends. The projects varied from interactive ebooks for middle school education to interactive, web-responsive, and self-directed learning modules for medical education. On May 8, the class became our most recent graduates and colleagues. We are proud of all they accomplished during their short stay with us and look forward to great things from them.

Class of 2015 (from left): Mike Jensen (faculty), Diana Flicek (staff), Bill Andrews (faculty), Megan Llewellyn, Josh Klein,  Regina Milner, Brandon Holt, Temerity Matthews, Lauren Halligan, Meaghan Hetherton, Leigh Gass, Mat Severson, Amanda Behr (faculty)
 
Class of 2015
 
 
 
Medical Illustration Students Receive Honors
at Augusta University/UGA Student Scientific & Medical Illustration Exhibition
March 25, 2015
 
2015 UGA/Augusta University Award WinnersPeter Lawrence, Santiago Junc, and Josh Klein (from left), students in the Medical Illustration Graduate Program at Augusta University, received special recognition at the 2015 Augusta University/UGA Student Scientific & Medical Illustration Exhibition. The exhibition is currently mounted at the Lamar Dodd School of Art on the University of Georgia campus in Athens and runs through April 2. More than fifty outstanding examples of scientific and medical illustration are on display. The scientific artwork documents and explains the natural world around us, and the medical artwork informs and enlightens us about the human body in health and disease. The exhibition is an annual collaboration between the BFA program in scientific illustration at the University of Georgia and the Augusta University Medical Illustration Graduate Program.
 
Three Augusta University students were recognized during the Awards Ceremony in Athens Wednesday, March 25. Josh Klein, Class of 2015, received the prestigious William J. Stenstrom Award of Excellence for “Neurovascular Anatomy of the Temporomandibular Joint.” His illustration (see photo attached) describes the complex anatomy surrounding TMJ for residents in oral surgery. Josh also received an Award of Merit for “Heart Murmurs,” a creative depiction of innocent heart murmurs, which is achieved by splashes of colorful paint flowing through the heart that represent the presence of expressive sounds. Santiago Junca, Class of 2016, received an Award of Merit for “The Tongue, Origins and Insertions.” His didactic illustration depicts the complex muscular system of the tongue for a medical student audience. Peter Lawrence, Class of 2016, received an Award of Merit for “Coronary Circulation: Arterial Supply of the Heart.” This suite of illustrations explains to undergraduate health science students the location of the coronary arteries and their primary branches, as well as the areas of the heart they serve.
 
Congratulations to all our talented award winners!
 
The entire exhibition will move to Augusta University’s Greenblatt Library in early April and will be on view through May.
 
The Stenstrom Award of Excellence honors William J. Stenstrom, EdD, former Program Director and Professor in the Department of Medical Illustration. He was a world-renowned ophthalmic illustrator, a visionary educator, and an active professional biomedical communicator. He received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association of Medical Illustrators in 1994 and the Louis Schmidt Award from the Biological Photographic Association in 2001. He received the Brödel Award for Excellence in Education from the AMI in 2007. in 1982, at the then-Medical College of Georgia, Bill was presented with the Outstanding Faculty Award from the School of Allied Health Sciences and, in 1991, the Distinguished Service Award. He was inducted into the Phi Delta Kappa, Kappa Delta Pi, and Alpha Eta national honor societies.
 
For more information about the exhibition or medical illustration, please contact Program Director Bill Andrews at 706/721-3266 or bandrews@augusta.edu.
 
David J. MascaroWith great sorrow the Dept. of Medical Illustration announces the death of Assoc. Professor Emeritus David Joseph Mascaro from cancer early on the morning of Thursday, March 19.

David was born February 2, 1941 to August and Mary Mascaro, in New York. As a young boy David received praise as an artist. As a young man he received extensive fine arts training at The Art Students League, The National Academy of Fine Arts and The School of Visual Arts, and the New York Phoenix School of Design, all in New York City. David also studied privately with Alton S. Tobey, noted historical painter, muralist, portrait artist and art instructor.

He was drafted into the US Army during the Vietnam War. He trained as an MP, and was subsequently posted to security at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, AL.

While on leave from the Arsenal, David journeyed to Augusta for an interview with O.A. Parkes, Director of the Medical Illustration Graduate Program at the Medical College of Georgia. After taking the prerequisite science courses, David matriculated in 1966. In 1969, he graduated with both his BS and MS in Medical Illustration. After graduation he worked as a professional medical illustrator at Syracuse University.

In 1971, David returned to MCG to join the faculty of Medical Illustration. His drawing and painting skills were exceptional, and he was an acknowledged master with color. He was great at visual problem solving and storytelling. David received numerous awards David teachingfor his artwork, and in 1999 he received the Brödel Award for Excellence in Education from the Association of Medical Illustrators (AMI). He published several articles on the use of color in medical illustration, conducted national and regional workshops on color theory, and was a longtime professional member of the AMI. David helped revise the illustrative work begun by the late Dr. Frank Netter for the CIBA Pharmaceutical Company. Perhaps most importantly, David had a remarkable ability to relate and connect with the students. Having learned well from Mr. Parkes, David continued to instill and foster a sense of family and camaraderie among the students and faculty, a trait that has been such a distinctive characteristic of the Georgia program. As a teacher, mentor, and friend he has had a positive and enduring influence on over 300 MCG students and a great many members of the AMI.
David presenting a demo
Capping a 29-year career in teaching at MCG, David was recognized with the Distinguished Service Award from the School of Allied Health Sciences in 2000. David retired from daily teaching responsibilities at the end of June that same year. Later that summer, the program established the David J. Mascaro Teaching Gallery of Medical Illustration as a lasting tribute to this gifted teacher and artist.

In 2007 he came out of retirement to teach in the Medical Illustration Graduate Program part-time. He retired again in 2010. He also taught drawing and painting in the Art Department at Augusta State University from time to time.

David was also a successful gallery artist and painting instructor. While at MCG and in retirement, he painted many portraits of eminent persons at MCG and around Augusta. David was the owner of Mascaro Studio & Gallery, where hetaught painting.

Memorial arrangements will be announced. David is survived by his wife Gail and his sister Mary. His son Giancarlo predeceased him, in 2011.

David will be dearly missed, but he will long be remembered for his great warmth, friendship, generosity, and infectious laughter.

Bob BenassiOn Friday, March 13, during the O.A. Parkes Symposium, the Augusta University Medical Illustration Graduate Program honored an individual who has had a profound and enduring impact on the program and on the profession—Robert C. Benassi, a gentleman and an artist who was and is truly in a class by himself.

Robert Charles Benassi and his sister Florence were born in Duluth, Minnesota to Emily and Charlie Paul Benassi. His father was a crane operator as well as a fur tapper. A Chippewa Indian taught him the art of trapping, and how to survive in the wilderness. Charlie Benassi in turn taught these survival skills to his son Bob—and they played a vital roll in Bob’s survival during the WWII.

Growing up in the great north woods of Minnesota learning the ways of the Chippewa sounds like an idyllic boyhood. But shortly after Bob’s graduation from high school and technical school, where he learn technical and mechanical drawing, he entered WWII on April 6, 1943.

When asked how he became interested in medical illustration, Bob replied that it was due to the war. On June 7, 1944—the day after D-Day—Bob waded onto Omaha Beach. He was initially assigned to the 9th Air Force and shortly after the battle of St. Lo in northern France, was re-assigned to the 29th Army Tactical Air Command. He had two jobs in the 29th. First, he aided in coordinating air-ground support for front line troops. This was an extremely dangerous job, which frequently took him behind enemy lines as a forward observer. The lessons in survival and woodcraft from his father helped keep him alive. Second, he also was responsible for creating tactical maps tracking the movements of Allied forces as they advanced across France and into Germany. In order to accomplish his job responsibilities Bob was provided with two very important pieces of equipment—a Thomson 45 CAL submachine gun to keep him alive and a graphics design kit, which included a Leroy lettering set. Both are undoubtedly powerful weapons.

During his reconnaissance missions he would come across abandoned German combat aid stations. In these stations he found line drawings of field surgeries and the procedures for wound dressing. Bob learned about medical illustration on the battlefields of Europe.
 
After the war, Bob returned to Minnesota determined to learn more about medical art. In his search for more information, Bob first paid a visit to Jean Hearst, a medical illustrator working for the University of Minnesota. During the interview she advised Bob that being a medical illustrator was not a job for a man.

Bob finally convinced Ms. Hearst of his seriousness, so she gave him the list of schools with medical illustration programs. The University of Illinois at Chicago was the closest, so he went and visited with Program Director Tom Jones. During this meeting, Mr. Jones made many suggestions about the courses Bob should take in order to become better prepared to study medical illustration. Heeding the advice, Bob put his nose to the academic grindstone and in 1949 graduated with a B.S. in Zoology from the University of Minnesota.

Upon his graduation from the University of Minnesota he applied to the four programs: John Hopkins University; University of Illinois at Chicago; the University of Texas Health Science Center at Dallas; and the newly formed program at the Miracle College of Georgia. The first school he heard back from was MCG, so he immediately sent his deposit to hold a place in that program. The MCG Program Director at the time was Jack Wilson, a former student of Max Brödel’s at Johns Hopkins. Mr. Wilson’s immediate efforts were directed towards planning a curriculum that would warrant the awarding of the Master of Science in Medical Illustration degree.

Bob Benassi presented with bronze bust by artist Gillian DuncanTowards the end of the Summer of 1949 Professor Wilson left for Florida with the prospects of a job at the Ringling School. Orville A. Parkes, also a student of Brödel’s, was recruited from Duke University to take over the fledgling program.

After graduating from MCG Bob and his wife Rita moved back to Minneapolis. He had no job prospects. But Bob, like most enterprising individuals, put on a pair of good walking shoes and started knocking on doors.  His first stop was at the University of Minnesota photographic lab. The medical photographer offered to introduce Bob to the surgeons when they stopped by the photo lab.

He was introduced to Dr. Owen H. Wangensteen, Chair Department of Surgery, who was working on a surgical atlas and needed a medical illustrator. From this chance meeting, Bob became associated with many high-energy out-of-the-box innovative thinking surgeons. Bob became one of the very first successful private practice medical illustrators in the country.
 
Dr. Owen H. Wangensteen, was a pioneer in various types of surgery who trained generations of other surgeons. Medical students from all over the world were attracted to the department because of his strong emphasis on research and laboratory experiment. Through his leadership, University of Minnesota surgeons played leading roles in pioneering open-heart surgery in the 1950's. Dr. Wangensteen had two very talented surgeons so he created two cardiac surgical teams; Dr. C. Walton Lillihei and Dr. Varco each developed surgical approaches for increasing efficiency and productivity in the cardiac OR. And Dr. Christaan N. Barnard and Dr. Norman E. Shumway, who performed some of the first human heart transplants, were among Dr. Wangensteen’s former students.

All along, Bob was working side by side with these surgeons documenting new surgical techniques and medical discoveries. He was at the right place at the right time, with the appropriate knowledge and skills.

In 1952 Dr. Jesse E. Edwards, M.D. a cardiac surgeon and cardiac pathologist, left the Mayo Clinic to move to Minneapolis / St. Paul. Bob met Dr. Edwards in 1954 and started working with him, a collaboration that continued for 40 years, until Edwards passed away in 2008. Most notably, Bob worked with Dr. Edwards on a three-volume illustrated reference, An Atlas of Acquired Diseases of the Heart and Great Vessels, and a two-volume illustrated reference: Congenital Heart Diseases. During their collaboration Bob created over 5000 illustrations.

Dr. John J. Wild developed the diagnostic ultrasound machine that would ultimately provide pregnant mothers with the first image of their unborn child. He is considered the Father of Ultrasound. Bob was his medical illustrator. Their collaboration blossomed into a lifelong friendship.

Bob was in private practice for 18 years, from 1953 to 1971. Then, in ‘71 a headhunter recruited Bob to work at the Mayo Clinic as a board artist in Medical Graphics. This suited Bob, as he was looking for a change and was ready to relocate his family. Mayo had a large backlog of illustration work, and Bob was the right man for the job. Then in 1973, Vince Destro, Section Head of Medical Graphics, stepped aside. Bob became Section Head, providing innovative and visionary leadership for the next 16 years.

Bob led the Section of Medical Illustration to achieve many significant advances. For instance, the Mayo Clinic became the first medical institution in the United States to use computer graphics, generating text slides, charts and graphics and relatively simple illustrations. For this accomplishment and the support it provided, particularly for  Urology, Bob received the William P. Didusch Art Award from the American Urological Association “For outstanding contributions to urological education through the conceptual clarity and artistic excellence in the development of a computer graphics system for medical illustration.”

Bob also the led the establishment of a digital video archival system for cataloging over 60,000 medical illustrations using the Systematic Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED).

Bob was instrumental in establishing an institutional policy for copyrighting and maintaining all Mayo medical illustration in order to retain the intellectual property, a valuable asset for the Mayo Clinic. Under his leadership, Mayo became a recognized leader and champion for other medical institutions and entrepreneurs about the importance of retaining and protecting intellectual property rights.

Bob enjoyed the comradeship of his fellow illustrators as indeed the entire staff in Medical Graphics. They worked as a team in support of patient care, research, and education at the Mayo Clinic.

In 1989, after 16 years as Section Head of Medical Graphics, Bob stepped down. Michael Belknap ('75), who succeeded Bob, said he was a real tough act to follow. Bob retired from The Mayo Clinic in 1995.

In 2011, the Association of Medical Illustrators honored Bob with the Lifetime Achievement Award.

It was with sincere appreciation for his many outstanding and enduring contributions to the profession and to the Program, that we honored Robert C. Benassi with the very first Outstanding Alumni Award.

In further recognition of Bob’s many professional accomplishments and unique status in the Program, a bronze and steel sculpture of Bob was unveiled. It features Bob’s face and hands at life size. He is shown with pen poised over his drawing of a piggyback heart transplant. The base of the sculpture is a custom crafted representation of an oak drawing table of the sort used by early students in the Medical Illustration Graduate Program. The sculpture now resides in a place of honor in the lobby of the department in Augusta. Gillian Duncan (Class of 1977) lovingly crafted the sculpture. As part of the unveiling, Gillian gave a fascinating presentation about the complex process of creating and casting the sculpture. Gillian is a renowned anaplastologist, with clinical offices in both Rochester and Minneapolis, MN.

Presented by Bill Andrews, Program Director, Friday, March 13, 2015 in Augusta, GA.



Josh Klein GlaucomaThe Medical Illustration Graduate Program at Augusta University (the Georgia Program) hosted the O.A. Parkes Symposium & International Student Conference on March 13 & 14, 2015. Featured events included a Salon of artwork and a Theatre of animation and multimedia. Over 90 entries were received from around the world. It is a pleasure to recognize the following award recipients for their creative, informative and accurate work:
 
Mascaro Award for Outstanding Achievement in Color: Josh Klein, for Glaucoma. Josh is a member of the Class of 2015 in the Georgia Program.
 
Gold Medal for Color Illustration: Rogier Trompert, for Cow and Chicken.
 
Silver Medal for Color Illustration: Caitlin Mock, for Conjunct Rotation of the Knee.
 
Gold Medal for Line Illustration: Emily Ling, for Bronchial Tree: Primary and Secondary Branches.
 
Silver Medal for Tone Illustration: Jonathan Bowen, for Cecal Fecal Matters.
 
Gold Medal for Tone Illustration: Amy Zhong, for Claw Dimorphism of the Male Fiddler Crab.
 
Silver Medal for Tone Illustration: I-Hsun Wu, for Pterional Craniotomy for Clinoidal Meningioma.
 
Garlington Award for Outstanding Achievement in Instructional Print Media: Qingyang Chen, for Retinitis Pigmentosa.
 
Silver Medal for Instructional Design: Caitlin Swanberg, for Stem Cell Modification using CRISPR and its Defense Against Disease.

Harrison Award for Outstanding Achievement in Animation: Meredith Osborn, for Aspirin and Ibuprofen Interactions.

Congratulations to all these talented award recipients!
 
The named awards were inaugurated at the conference, and honor three faculty members in the Georgia Program who have had a profound and enduring impact on medial illustration education.

Garlington Award for Outstanding Achievement in Instructional Print Media— Octavia Garlington was a teacher in the Georgia Program for almost 30 years. In recognition of her instructional contributions to the field, she has been the recipient of the Brödel Award for Excellence in Education from the Association of Medical Illustrators (AMI) and the Distinguished Alumni Award from the College of Allied Health Sciences. This award commemorates her life-long passion for effective art in science education, and recognizes an entry that best demonstrates outstanding achievement in instructional print media.
 
Harrison Award for Outstanding Achievements in Animation— Steven J. Harrison, PhD has over 40 years experience in the field, including nearly 30 years as faculty, first at the Dallas program and for the last 23 years, at the Georgia Program. He his contributions to the field he has received the AMI’s Lifetime Achievement Award and the Brödel Award for Excellence in Education. Steve received a Distinguished Alumni Award from the College of Allied Health Sciences. He is the only medical illustrator to win an Emmy Award for animation.  This award commemorates his passion for instructional animation, and recognizes an entry that best demonstrates the outstanding use of animation in science education.
 
Mascaro Award for Outstanding Achievement in Color— David J. Mascaro was a renowned master of color theory and application, and a teacher in the Georgia Program for over 30 years. In recognition of his contributions to the field, he received the AMI’s Brödel Award for Excellence in Education. David was recognized by the College of Allied Health Sciences with both a Distinguished Service Award and a Distinguished Alumni Award. To commemorate and honor his passion for teaching the effective use of color, this award recognizes an entry that best demonstrates the outstanding use of color in print media.



  • Tasha Obrin, Class of 2014, received two awards for her iBook entitled “The Role of Liver Biochemistry in Blood Tests and Veterinary Medicine.” She received an Award of Excellence in the Interactive Media category, as well as the Student Best of Show Award in New Media. This is the second year in a row that an MIGP student has received the Student Best of Show Award in New Media.
  • Josh Klein, Class of 2015, received the Ralph Sweet Award, Professional Best in Show, for his work on "Wall Repair" as an undergraduate at the University of Toledo with Roy Schneider and Tony Floyd-Bradstock

Josh Klein Class of 2015

"Wall Repair"- Josh Klein- Class of 2015

Several of our faculty, alumni or the companies they run received honors in the Professional Salon during the 69th annual conference of the Association of Medical Illustrators. Awards went to:

  • Assistant Adjunct Professor William C. “Kip” Carter, Jr. ('82), University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine: Award of Merit, Advertising and Marketing/Promotional category, for “Feed Induced Laminitis.”

  • Jennifer Darcy ('04), Amicus Visual Solutions: Award of Excellence, Medical-Legal category, for “Summary of Jane Doe’s Injuries.”

  • Mega Gullotto ('12), Amicus Visual Solutions: Award of Excellence, Medical-Legal category, for “Pharyngeal Tumor Removal with Hemimandibulectomy, Maxillectomy, and Reconstruction.”

  • Amicus Visual Solutions, owned by Asha Kays ('01): Award of Merit, Medical-Legal category, for “Jane Doe’s 12/16/11 Right Hand Tenolysis Surgery.”

  • Kelvin Li ('08), Nucleus Medical Media: Award of Excellence, Animation, Didactic/Instructional – Non-commercial category, for “PlasmaJet.”

  • Nobles Green II ('05), also with Nucleus Medical Media,received an Award of Merit in the Animation, Didactic/Instructional – Non-commercial category for his animation entitled “Robot Myomectomy.”

  • Elizabeth McDonald ('10): Award of Excellence, Animation, Advertising and Marketing/Promotional category, for “BD Vystra Disposable Pen.”

  • Nucleus Medical Media, owned by Ron Collins ('90) and Keith Pavlik ('89): Award of Merit, Animation, Advertising and Marketing/Promotion category, for “Custom Animated Patient Education: Mitral Valve Prolapse.”

  • iSO-FORM, LLC, owned in part by Nick Klein ('09) and Andrew Swift ('90): Award of Excellence, Interactive Media, Didactic/Instructional – Commercial category, for “BoneBox – Dental.”

  • Michael Konomos ('06) and Andy Matlock ('98), Emory University School of Medicine: Award of Excellence, Interactive Media, Didactic/Instructional – Commercial category, for “Surgical Anatomy of the Liver.”

  • Will McAbee ('13) and Brad Gilleland ('02), University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine: Award of Merit, Interactive Media, Interactive Textbook category, for “The Equine Tarsus.”

  • Gordon Nealy ('83) and Mimic Technologies:  Charlotte Holt Award of Excellence, Simulators, Prosthetics and Sculptural Products category, for “daVinci Trainer – Hydra System.”

Nobles Green 2014 Award of Merit

"Robot Myomectomy"- Nobles Green II - Class of 2005

 


With the Class of 2014, a very bright, talented, and creative group, the Medical Illustration program at Augusta University reaches 350 total graduates! We are pleased to introduce them, proud to acknowledge them as colleagues, and delighted to recognize them as our alumni.

Please visit their websites to learn more about their specific skills and capabilities.

Amy D’Camp earned a BA in Biological and Pre-medical Illustration at Iowa State University in her home state. Her master's project, “Chamber Septation and Development of the Fetal Heart,” was a beautiful 3D animation for medical student education.  dcampillustration.com

Ellen C. Davis, from Alabama, earned a BFA in Scientific Illustration at the University of Georgia. Her master's project was a comprehensive 2D animation for patient education on “Understanding Asthma: Uniform Patient and Family Education for Children’s Hospital of Georgia.”  precisionmedicalmedia.com

Joel B. Floyd, Jr. is from South Carolina, where he earned a BA in Studio Art from the College of Charleston. His master's project on “The Placenta: Its Development and Function,” was a fascinating 3D animation for medical student education.  betheamedicalmedia.com

Brittany G. King earned a BS in Biology from Winthrop University. A South Carolina native, her master's project, “Invisible System: Lymphatics of the Head and Neck and Their Receptive Areas,” was an illustrated iBook for dental student education.  

Elizabeth Nixon-Shapiro, from Georgia, earned a BFA in Scientific Illustration and a BS in Ecology from the University of Georgia. “The Anatomy of Motor System pathways,” her master's project, was an interactive, animated learning module for medical students.  nixonmedicalmedia.com

Morgan L. Noonan is from New Jersey and earned an undergraduate degree from the University of Maryland. Her master's project was a stylish 2D and 3D hybrid animation for patient education on “Antibiotic Resistance and You.” 

Tasha L. Obrin hails from Ohio, and earned a BA in Biological and Pre-medical Illustration at Iowa State University. For her master's project she created an illustrated and animated iBook for veterinary student education: “The Role of Liver Biochemistry in Blood Tests and Veterinary Medicine.” 

Russell Weekes came to us from Utah, where he earned a BFA in Art from Utah State University. Russ’s master's project, “CerviCusco HPV Vaccination,” was a colorful, interactive 2D animation for patient education and public information among an indigenous multicultural population. 

Class of 2014

Class of 2014

 


The Graduate School at Augusta University just completed its annual Graduate Research Day, and it was another great event. During the event, the Dept. of Medical Illustration sponsors the Educational Multimedia Award. This year there were four outstanding entries:

1) "A Visual Guide to Passive Insufficiency," an interactive educational animation by Berrien Chidsey

2) "A Visual Guide to Lung Injuries," an interactive animation for patient education by Will McAbee

3) "Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System," an interactive eBook for college students by Jamie Rippke

4a) "Cosmetic Tattooing: Camouflaging Normal Scar Tissue," an eBook for physicians by Lisa Sato
4b) "Cosmetic Tattoos for Camouflaging Normal Scar Tissue," an eBook for patients by Lisa Sato

We are justifiably proud of the very fine work by all these exceptional students. The judging panel was unanimous in deciding to present this year's Educational Multimedia Award to Lisa R. Sato. The judges found her work to be creative, beautiful, effective and professionally executed. A copy of the cover of her physicians’ guide is attached. Congratulations, Lisa!

Lisa Sata- Cosmetic Tattooing

Lisa Sato- Class of 2014, "Cosmetic Tattooing"

 


Once again, Gene & Allison Wright put on a wonderful show in Athens! Opening on March 20, the 2014 Augusta University/UGA Student Scientific & Medical Illustration Exhibition runs through April 1 at the Lamar Dodd School of Art on the University of Georgia campus in Athens. More than fifty masterful pieces of scientific and medical illustration are on display. The scientific artwork documents and explains the natural world around us, and the medical artwork enlightens and inspires us about the world of medical science and the inner-workings of the human body. The illustrations were created by students in the BFA program scientific illustration at the University of Georgia, Athens (UGA) and in the medical illustration graduate program at the Augusta University (Augusta University).

At the Awards Ceremony in Athens on Wednesday, March 26, three Augusta University students received special honors. Elizabeth Nixon-Shapiro, Class of 2014, received the prestigious William J. Stenstrom Award of Excellence for “Cardiac Ablation of the Mitral Valve.” The purpose of this illustration is to depict the ablation of aberrant electrophysiological signals in the heart from a novel and dramatic point of view in order to increase reader interest in a journal. Amy D’Camp, Class of 2014, received an Award of Merit for “Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy.” The purpose of this illustration is to instruct surgical residents about the procedure, including nerve-sparing techniques to prevent incontinence. Megan Llewellyn, Class of 2015, received an Award of Merit for “Bullae Emphysema.” The purpose of this illustration is to document a specific pathological condition.

Congratulations to all our talented award winners!

Thank you, Gene and Allison, and all the fine folks in Athens, for your hard work and hospitality!

The entire exhibition will move to Augusta University’s Greenblatt Library during Masters Week, and will be on view through May.

2014 Award Recipients

2014 Augusta University/UGA Scientific and Medical Illustration Award recipients. From left to right: Megan Llewellyn, Elizabeth Nixon-Shapiro, and Amy D'Camp

 

We are pleased to announce that selected works from the David J. Mascaro Teaching Gallery of Medical Illustration are included in the “Optic Chiasm: The Crossing Over of Art & Science” exhibition at the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art. The exhibit is held in conjunction with the Atlanta Science Festival and runs from March 22 - May 4. Notable works by Professor Bill Andrews, Joshua Bird ('12), Craig Luce ('77), David J. Mascaro ('69), William J. Stenstrom (Chair and Professor Emeritus, deceased), William Winn ('66) are included. Additional information can be found at museum.oglethorpe.edu.