Master of Science in Psychology

The graduate program in psychology provides intensive master’s degree level education and training, with most students selecting an applied track which emphasizes clinical and counseling psychology. The program can also provide preparation for further graduate education or, for a limited number of students, the opportunity to pursue specific interests in experimental psychology.

The Graduate School

What can I do with a Psychology Degree?


Careers

The M.S. program in psychology is designed as a full-time, day-time and year-round program. Most students complete their degree requirements in two years, earning credits in advanced foundation courses (e.g., learning, social, personality, statistics), applied course work (e.g., psychometry, counseling/ therapy, psychopathology) and supervised internship experience in treatment facilities or research laboratories. The department operates a psychometric and clinical training facility, and an animal and human research laboratory. Internship opportunities are available at many local agencies including a Veterans Administration Medical Center, a regional state psychiatric hospital, the Medical College of Georgia, a regional state school and hospital for the developmentally disabled, a regional state training center for juvenile offenders, and the Dwight David Eisenhower Army Medical Center at Fort Gordon.

 

 

The department operates a psychometric and clinical training facility, and an animal and human research laboratory. Internship opportunities are available at many local agencies including a Veterans Administration Medical Center, a regional state psychiatric hospital, the Medical College of Georgia, a regional state school and hospital for the developmentally disabled, a regional state training center for juvenile offenders, and the Dwight David Eisenhower Army Medical Center at Fort Gordon.

Degree Offerings


The Master of Science in Psychology offers three tracks: The clinical/counseling track, the general experimental track and the applied experimental track. Students who seek to pursue the doctoral degree are advised to complete the general experimental track. Those individuals who wish to work in more applied settings after graduation, such as a medical research environment, technical college, or community agencies are advised to choose the applied experimental track.

General Experimental Track

The general experimental track requires the satisfactory completion of a minimum of 47 semester hours of graduate work including Professional Issues in Psychology (PSYC 6190) and Ethical Issues in Psychology (PSYC 6191), Research Methods I and II (PSYC 6121 and PSYC 6122), Research Methods Lab I and Research Methods Lab II (PSYC 6921 and PSYC 6922), six semester hours of Research Practicum (PSYC 6930 and PSYC 6931), and six semester hours of Thesis Research (PSYC 6990). Beyond this, an individualized plan of study, conforming to the requirements of the department and approved by the student’s Academic Advisor and the Director of the Graduate Program, is used to establish a program of study. Students will be given formal permission by the faculty to pursue a thesis or internship at the end of the spring of their first year of graduate studies. The faculty will review the student’s professional goals, academic performance and professional and ethical behavior to determine whether the student will be in the thesis or internship track. For this track, at least 38 of 47 total hours required must be earned in the major field; and no more than six of the 45 total hours may be earned in PSYC 6990.

Applied Experimental Track

The applied experimental track requires the satisfactory completion of a minimum of 48 semester hours of graduate work including Professional Issues in Psychology (PSYC 6190) and Ethical Issues in Psychology (PSYC 6191), Research Methods I and II (PSYC 6121 and PSYC 6122), Research Methods Lab I and Research Methods Lab II (PSYC 6921 and PSYC 6922), six semester hours of Research Practicum (PSYC 6930 and PSYC 6931), Cognitive Assessment (PSYC 6126 and PSYC 6926), and six semester hours of Internship (PSYC 6940, PSYC 6970 and/or PSYC 6980). Beyond this, an individualized plan of study, conforming to requirements of the department and approved by the student’s Academic Advisor and the Director of the Graduate Program, is used to establish a program of study. Students will be given formal permission by the faculty to pursue a thesis or internship at the end of the spring semester of their first year of graduate studies. The faculty will review the student’s professional goals, academic performance, and professional and ethical behavior to determine whether the student will be in the thesis or internship track. For this track, at least 38 of the 48 total hours required must be earned in the major field; and no more than six of the 47 total hours may be earned in PSYC 6940, PSYC 6970, and/or PSYC 6980.

Clinical/Counseling Track

The clinical/counseling track offers a thesis or a non-thesis (internship) option. The plan of study, as approved by the student’s Academic Advisor and the Director of the Graduate Program, is used to determine whether the student will be in the thesis or internship track. The non-thesis option requires the satisfactory completion of a minimum of 53 semester hours of graduate courses as detailed below. Students who pursue the non-thesis option will need to complete at least 8 hours of PSYC 6960 Clinical Internship. All clinical/counseling students are strongly encouraged to carefully study the license requirements in the states where they may be employed in the future. For this track, at least 50 of the total hours required must be earned in the major field; and no more than 8 of the 53 hours may be earned in PSYC 6940, PSYC 6960 , PSYC 6970, PSYC 6980, and/or PSYC 6990.